Management and governance are the arbiters of success or failure when we look across a cloud services ecosystem and the full lifecycle of those applications. That's why governance is so important in the budding era of cloud computing.

As cloud-delivered services become the coin of the productivity realm, how those services are managed as they are developed, deployed, and used -- across a services lifecycle -- increasingly determines their true value.
And yet governance is still too often fractured, poorly extended across the development-and-deployment continuum, and often not able to satisfy the new complexity inherent in cloud models.

One key bellwether for future service environments and for defining the role and requirements for cloud governance is
in applications development, which due to the popularity of platform as a service (PaaS) is already largely a services ecosystem.

Here to help us explain why visibility across services creation and deployment is essential -- and how governance can be effectively baked into complex ecosystems -- we're joined by Jeff Papows, President and CEO of WebLayers and the author of Glitch: The Hidden Impact of Faulty Software, and John McDonald, CEO of CloudOne Corp. The discussion is moderated by BriefingsDirect's Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions.

Find the podcast on iTunes/iPod and Podcast.com. Read a transcript or download a copy. Get a copy of Glitch: The Hidden Impact of Faulty Software. Learn more about governance risks. Sponsor: WebLayers.  


An often-overlooked aspect of data center transformation (DCT) is what to do with the older assets inside of data centers as newer systems come online. Improperly disposing of data and other IT assets can cause great disruption and an increase in costs, if not liability and risk of regulatory penalties.

Indeed, many IT organizations are largely unaware of the security and privacy risks of the systems that they need to find a new home for and can often find themselves delivered to the wrong hands. So thinking through the retirement of older assets should be considered early in any DCT process.

Compliance and recycling issues, as well as data security concerns and proper software disposition should therefore be top of mind. DCT is a journey, and an essential part of that process is modernizing, but at the same time sun-setting older systems must come with data protection in mind, and even with an eye to monetize those older systems -- or at least recycle them properly.

In this podcast, we examine how HP manages productive transitions of data center assets -- from security and environmental impact, to recycling and resale, and even to rental of new and older systems during a DCT process. With to explain how to best take care of the older systems reducing risk, as well as providing a financial return, are Helen Tang, Worldwide Data Center Transformation Lead for HP Enterprise Business, and Jim O'Grady, Director of Global Life Cycle Asset Management Services with HP Financial Services. Welcome to the show. The discussion is moderated by BriefingsDirect's Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions.

Find the podcast on iTunes/iPod and Podcast.com. Read a full transcript or download a copy. Sponsor: HP.


We've all heard a lot about client virtualization or virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) over the past few years, and there are some really great technologies for delivering a PC client experience as a service.

But today’s business and economic drivers need to go beyond just good technology. There also needs to be a clear rationale for change -- both business and economic. Second, there needs to be proven methods for properly moving to client virtualization at low risk and in ways that lead to both high productivity and lower total costs over time.

Cloud computing, mobile device proliferation, and highly efficient data centers are all aligning to make it clear that the deeper and flexible client support from back-end servers will become more the norm and less the exception over time.

Client devices and application types will also be dynamically shifting both in numbers and types, and crossing the chasm between the consumer and business spaces. The new requirements for businesses point to the need for planning and proper support of infrastructures that can accommodate these clients, and to do so with an attractive long-term price-point.

So we're here to discuss how client virtualization infrastructure works, where it fits in to support multiple future client directions, and why it makes a tremendous amount of sense economically. To learn more about client virtualization strategies and best practices, we're joined by Dan Nordhues, Marketing and Business Manager for Client Virtualization Solutions in HP's Industry Standard Servers Organization. The interview is conducted by BriefingsDirect's Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions.

Find the podcast on iTunes/iPod and Podcast.com. Read a full transcript or download a copy. Sponsor: HP.

Direct download: BriefingsDirect-Client_Virtualization_Strategies_With_HP.mp3
Category:Enterprise IT -- posted at: 8:31 PM